Planters

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Planters

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Nothing enhances a space like vintage planters. Whether you’re looking for a unique piece to house a fern on a console, or you’re looking for a conversation piece to crown an outdoor dining table, you’re likely to find something to bring your vision to life within our curated collection of vintage planters here at Chairish. From Italian ceramic animal planters to brass planters to classical urn planters, our selection of vintage pots and planters runs the gamut. We partner with hundreds of dealers located all over the U.S.—and now Europe—to assemble an unrivaled collection of vintage plant pots. We carry planters from covetable antique and vintage brands and makers like Architectural Pottery, Jean Rogers, and Frederick Weinberg, as well as an assortment of newly-made planters, hand-selected by our buyers for their vintage-grade appeal.

Shop a Colorful Array of Vintage Planters

Our beyond-the basics collection of planters includes planters of virtually every shape, size, and origin. On the hunt for a large vintage planter to adorn an outdoor patio or house an indoor fig tree? We carry a wide selection of salvaged urns and epic terracotta pieces to fit the bill. You can also source unique items like Italian head planters, wire and wicker urn planters, Chinese fish bowl planters and more. Our cut of vintage planters is assembled by our in-house team of style experts, who are well-versed in the sorts of pieces top designers are looking for to complete their projects. As a bonus, all of the vintage planters you see on Chairish are in stock and ready-to-ships. Say goodbye to waits, delays, and backorders. Every vintage pot you see is here today, on its way tomorrow!

How to Find the Perfect Vintage Planter

As suburban yards have shrunk and urban residences with outdoor spaces have up-ticked, planters, simple to pop on a balcony or terrace, have thrived. While sprawling backyards require tireless weed-pulling, pruning, and propagating, the option to outfit plants in large ceramic planters—everything from cement planters to urns bought on the cheap—allow anyone to certify themselves a garden guru.

Perusing the planters at your local nursery, however, is liable to incite a premature freeze—which is to say nothing of vintage planters, with their myriad of designer names like Haeger, Roseville, and California Pottery. Options abound and it’s not always evident which planter crosses aesthetics and functionality best.

In-the-know gardeners will likely direct you to examine a few key characteristics, including the planter’s material, size, and drainage capabilities. Unglazed terracotta pots may be the ubiquitous planters of your youth but rarely do they give a seedling or sapling a fighting chance—unglazed terracotta is notorious for allowing moisture to seep out. While you can remedy this with clockwork watering, a plethora of other planters, from cement planters to fiberglass, beckon.

With planters, just like with rugs, going bigger is always better. A larger planter means more soil, which in turn gives a plant’s roots the opportunity to expand. While we’re on the subject: Choose plants that are destined to stay small. Opting for a plant that will grow too large will inevitably have you re-potting in no time. If you truly have your heart set on raising a Meyer lemon tree or showpiece-caliber hydrangea, do some groundwork first and call around to nurseries that specialize in dwarf versions.

Lastly, and perhaps most pertinently, heed the importance of a drainage hole. While it can be tempting to unceremoniously drop a grocery store-bought herb into a pint-sized pot sans drainage hole you’ll soon be reaping the repercussions: namely, a plant suffering from rot. Treat drainage holes as a matter of necessity, not recommendation, especially when looking to invest in large planters that will hold pricey statement plants. If you do fall in love with a planter, say, a Mediterranean planter or Chinese planter pot, that doesn’t have a hole, a local plant shop (or masonry yard) can likely drill one for you.